Twitter at NYSETwitter, of all social networking sites, is addressing the issue about death and how it will handle accounts owned by deceased users.

It’s a serious issue, and not all people who lost their loved one want to see photos of their dead family members circulating on the web — and finally, Twitter opens up about its rules and regulations when it comes to removing photos, accounts and other files from dead people on its servers.

Following the death of actor Robin Williams, and the publicized bullying of Williams’ daughter Zelda Williams — the popular micro-blogging site has posted an internet page (or help center) which includes all the details about request for removal of photos and deactivation of accounts of a deceased.

For the deactivation of a Twitter account specifically those owned by deceased, Twitter said that they can “work with a person authorized to act on the behalf of the estate or with a verified immediate family member of the deceased to have an account deactivated.” Twitter also listed all the required documents in order to facilitate the request. For removal of photos, Twitter made the process easier.

“Immediate family members and other authorized individuals may request the removal of images or video of deceased individuals, from when critical injury occurs to the moments before or after death, by sending an e-mail to privacy@twitter.com,” Twitter explains.

Internet is a free platform, but sometimes, people abuse it — and Twitter is evidently aware of the issue. According to the Wall Street Journal, Twitter is now assessing its policies that cover the situation. Del Harvey of Twitter’s Trust and Safety department said that they’re now evaluating its policies and expanding them to improve its support for family members of deceased users.